Sitemap

Brewing Trouble: Climate Change Impacts Key Ingredient for Beer

CorD Recommends

Serbia Awards Distinctions to Notable Personalities on National Day

In a ceremonial tribute to Serbia's National...

Western Balkans Eye EU Membership by 2028

At the esteemed Munich Security Conference, a...

Southeast Europe Unites in Support for Ukraine at Tirana Summit

In a striking demonstration of unity from Tirana, Southeast European leaders, together with Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenski, have collectively...

New Management In Schneider Electric Serbia And Montenegro

Schneider Electric, the global leader in digital transformation of energy management and automation, announces the appointment of Miloš Vuksanović...

Nestlé Unveils Plant-Based Meal Factory in Surčin, Serbia, with a €80 Million Investment

Nestlé has taken a significant step towards expanding its sustainable food production footprint by inaugurating a new €80 million...

Serbia Commits €5.4 Billion to Renewable Energy by 2030

Serbia's state-owned power company, Elektroprivreda Srbije (EPS), has announced an ambitious plan to invest €5.4 billion in renewable energy...

Serbia and Angola Cement Cultural Bonds with New Cooperation Programme

Serbia and Angola have inked a Cultural Cooperation Programme set to span from 2024 to 2026, as announced by...

The production of popular beverages like coffee, tea, and wine is becoming increasingly difficult on a warming planet. Recent studies focusing on how climate change affects renowned drinks have highlighted that global warming plays a significant role in the quantity and quality of hops, the primary ingredient in most beers. 

Consequently, beer is likely to become more expensive in the future, compelling producers to adjust their brewing methods.

Scientists predict that hop yields in European regions where they are cultivated will decrease by 4-18% by 2050 if farmers don’t adapt to the warmer and drier climate. Furthermore, the alpha acid content in hops, responsible for the distinctive taste and aroma of beer, will decline by 20-31%. 

“Those who enjoy beer will certainly feel the impact of climate change, be it in the cost or the quality. According to our findings, it’s inevitable,” stated Miroslav Trnka, a scientist from the Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences and co-author of the study published in Nature Communications.

Beer, the third most popular drink globally after water and tea, is typically flavoured with aromatic hops. These hops are primarily grown in mid-latitude regions sensitive to changes in light, temperature, and water.

In their research, scientists compared the average annual yield of aromatic hops between 1971-1994 and 1995-2018, uncovering a significant drop in production ranging from 0.13-0.27 tons per hectare. The most substantial decline in annual hop yield was observed in Celje, Slovenia, at 19.4%. Meanwhile, Germany, the world’s second-largest hop producer, saw average yields decrease by 19.1%.

Central Europe has a rich beer-making history spanning thousands of years and is integral to its culture. The Czech Republic, for instance, boasts the highest beer consumption globally, as noted in a report by Japanese beer manufacturer Kirin. In Germany, where beer production has been governed by the Purity Law for over 500 years, Oktoberfest annually welcomes millions of global visitors.

Read more...

European Banking Titans Surpass €100 Billion Profit Milestone Amid Rising Interest Rates

For the first time in history, Europe's banking behemoths have collectively breached the €100 billion profit ceiling, fueled by a significant uptick in interest...

Western Balkans Eye EU Membership by 2028

At the esteemed Munich Security Conference, a cornerstone event in global security discourse, leaders from North Macedonia, Albania, and Montenegro have passionately renewed their...

However, the study also revealed that the alpha acid content in hops, providing beer with its distinct aroma, has decreased in all beer-producing regions. This drop in hop production will be most felt in Slovenia, Portugal, and Spain.

While the climate threat to hops is significant, it isn’t the most prominent factor influencing beer prices. High energy costs, propelled by the escalating gas prices due to wars, have so far played a more substantial role for brewers.

“The cost of hops in beer isn’t even as much as the cap on the bottle,” concludes the report.

Related Articles

European Banking Titans Surpass €100 Billion Profit Milestone Amid Rising Interest Rates

For the first time in history, Europe's banking behemoths have collectively breached the €100 billion profit ceiling, fueled by a significant uptick in interest...

Western Balkans Eye EU Membership by 2028

At the esteemed Munich Security Conference, a cornerstone event in global security discourse, leaders from North Macedonia, Albania, and Montenegro have passionately renewed their...

EIB Global Channels Record €1.2 Billion into Western Balkans

EIB Global, the European Investment Bank's arm for non-EU activities, has made a landmark investment of €1.2 billion in the Western Balkans for 2023,...

The EU and UNDP allocated 580,000 euros for civil society

The European Union and the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) have allocated funds for the implementation of 12 initiatives of civil society organizations (CSOs)...

EU Agreement Grants Consumers the Right to Repair Beyond Warranty Period

In a significant stride towards sustainability, European Union negotiators have reached a political agreement on a directive that will grant consumers the right to...

India Set to Overtake Japan and Germany, Eyeing Third Spot in Global Economy by 2027

India is poised for a monumental economic leap, projected to surpass Japan and Germany to claim the title of the world's third-largest economy by...

IMF Boosts Global Growth Forecast Amid Lower Energy Costs

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has revised its forecast for global economic growth upwards for this year, buoyed by robust consumer spending and declining...

Croatia Tops Affordability Chart for EU Arable Land

The European Union's 2022 data unveils a captivating snapshot of arable land prices, with Croatia emerging as the beacon of affordability for potential landowners.  In...