Sitemap

Private Japanese Moon Lander Snaps 1st Photos In Deep Space

CorD Recommends

Thousands of Tons of Frozen Water Found on Mars’ Volcano Summit

In a groundbreaking study published in the...

More People Opting Out of News Consumption Due to Content

The latest research shows that an increasing...

By Emmanuel B. Nyirinkindi, IFC's Vice President of Cross-Cutting Solutions

Public-Private Partnerships Key to Serbia’s Green Future

Five years ago, dark, polluted water with...

Oxford University to Return Stolen 500-Year-Old Hindu Saint Statue to India

Oxford University in the UK has committed...

Finland Leads EU in Uranium Extraction

In a pioneering move within the European Union, Finnish mining and chemical company Terrafame has begun extracting uranium, as...

World’s Oldest Liquid Wine Found in Roman Tomb in Spain

The world’s oldest wine in liquid form has been discovered in a Roman tomb, boasting a reddish-brown hue due...

Mickoski Proposes New Government for North Macedonia

Hristijan Mickoski, leader of VMRO-DPMNE and the designated Prime Minister of North Macedonia, has formally submitted his proposed cabinet...

King Frederick X Inaugurates First Section of Undersea Tunnel Connecting Denmark and Germany

King Frederick X of Denmark has inaugurated the first segment of the ambitious 18-kilometre Fehmarn Belt tunnel beneath the...

Belgrade Hotel Union Sold for €6.2 Million

Hotel Union, a historic landmark in Belgrade, has been sold for 727 million dinars (€6.2 million) at a public...

The Hakuto-R lander is coming online after its Dec. 11 launch. A private Japanese moon lander has opened its eyes in deep space.

The Hakuto-R lander has snapped its first photos since launching atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket on Sunday morning (Dec. 11), representatives of ispace, the Tokyo-based company that operates the spacecraft, announced early Tuesday morning (Dec. 13).

“While initial checkout operations continue in ispace’s Mission Control Center (MCC), we have also received the first images taken by our lander-mounted camera! This is an image of the Earth about 19 hours after separation from the launch vehicle,” ispace said via Twitter.

“What looks like a crescent moon here is actually the Earth. In the lower right, you can see a plate showing our Hakuto-R corporate partners (as of March 2022),” the company added in another tweet.

If all goes according to plan, Hakuto-R will arrive at the moon in April, pulling off the first-ever soft lunar touchdown for a Japanese spacecraft. The lander will then deploy a small rover called Rashid for the United Arab Emirates’ space agency.

But ispace isn’t looking that far ahead yet. This is a test flight, the first-ever mission for ispace, and the company is taking things slowly. The mission team is checking off boxes one by one — and Hakuto-R is hitting its marks so far.

To date, the team has established communications with the lander and gotten it into a stable orientation with a consistent power supply. Team members also have “confirmation that there were no deficiencies in the lander’s core systems,” ispace wrote in an update on Monday (Dec. 12).

Hakuto-R’s journey will lay the foundation for many more missions to come, if all goes according to ispace’s plan. The company intends to launch its second mission to the lunar surface in 2024 and its third — a flight for NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program — a year later.

The Hakuto-R moon lander, which is operated by Tokyo-based company ispace, snapped this photo of Earth about 19 hours after separating from its SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The spacecraft launched on Dec. 11, 2022. (Image credit: ispace via Twitter)

After that, ispace is targeting two moon missions a year, company founder and CEO Takeshi Hakamada told Space.com recently.

“Our vision is to establish an economically viable, sustainable ecosystem in cislunar [space],” Hakamada said.

Hakuto-R didn’t ride to space alone on Sunday. The Falcon 9 also lofted Lunar Flashlight, a briefcase-sized NASA spacecraft that will hunt for water ice from orbit around the moon.

Source: space.com

Related Articles

Imperial Instagram Debut as Japanese Monarchy Embraces Social Media

In a digital rite of passage, the Japanese Imperial Family has gracefully navigated its way into the realm of social media, unveiling an Instagram...

Successful Japanese Culinary Workshop Held in Belgrade

The Japanese Embassy, in collaboration with Go Sushi Ušće, hosted a Japanese food workshop in Belgrade, attracting culinary enthusiasts keen on mastering the art...

Japan’s Generous Health Sector Aid to Serbia Strengthens Bonds

In a display of enduring friendship and solidarity, the Japanese Embassy in Serbia, led by Ambassador Akira Imamura, has announced a significant donation to...

Japanese Embassy Hosts Ceremonial Reception for Emperor Naruhito’s Birthday

The Embassy of Japan in Belgrade held a ceremonial reception to celebrate the birthday of the Emperor of Japan, Naruhito, at the Metropol Hotel...

National Day of Japan marked in Belgrade

The Embassy of Japan in Belgrade held a ceremonial reception to celebrate the birthday of the Emperor of Japan, Naruhito, at the Metropol Hotel...

India Set to Overtake Japan and Germany, Eyeing Third Spot in Global Economy by 2027

India is poised for a monumental economic leap, projected to surpass Japan and Germany to claim the title of the world's third-largest economy by...

H.E. Akira Imamura, Ambassador of Japan to Serbia

Farewell “Japanac”

The 93 yellow buses that were donated by Japan to the City of Belgrade in 2003, and which are affectionately referred to as “Japanac”...

Bilateral Trade & Investment

Serbia Attracts Japanese Giants

The distance of more than 9,000 kilometres separating Belgrade and Tokyo certainly represents one of the key reasons why the trade exchange between the...