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Dejan Šoškić

Professor Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade

Dejan Soskic

Dejan Šoškić, Professor at the Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade (EFB)

Real Measure of Our Success

It is true that Serbia recently borrowed on the external market at an extremely low interest rate compared to the previous borrowing of our country, but it remains three times higher than the interest rate paid by Portugal or Bulgaria. Greece’s experience shows that a country mustn’t give in to the temptation to substantially raise its public debt in conditions of low interest rates
Dejan Soskic Banks Cannot Thrive In A Stagnant Economy

Dejan Šoškić, Professor at the Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade (EFB)

Banks Cannot Thrive In A Stagnant Economy

Major obstacles to faster economic growth in Serbia are not in the domain of the limited financial potential of domestic banks. Obstacles lay elsewhere: in the domain of a stagnant economy, weak institutional framework, rule of law, and credit risk sharing instruments for SMEs. As such, we shouldn’t be surprised if more foreign banks decide to leavein the medium- to long-term.
Dejan Soskic

Professor Dejan Šoškić, Ph.D., Faculty of Economics, University of Belgrade

Reforms Have Begun – Toughest Yet to Come

Serbia made its last standby arrangement with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in early 2015. With this programme our country committed to making significant progress in three important areas: (1) restoring the sustainability of public finances; (2) increasing the stability and resilience of the financial sector; and (3) implementing comprehensive structural reforms aimed at increasing employment and again achieving sustainable high economic growth.
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