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Maja Turković, CWP Senior Vice President For Development In Europe

CWP Is Mission-Driven

CWP is developing a portfolio of renewable energy projects, in Serbia, Bulgaria, Romania and Ukraine with a total capacity of 1.6 GW, including 500 MW in Serbia. The team in Belgrade is growing constantly and today consists of 23 highly educated and motivated employees who work diligently to implement projects

Serbia has yet to show that it has the capacity for more than two or three serious players, but that will also change slowly, says an expectant Maja Turković, who believes that the Law on Renewable Energy Sources will contribute to facilitating the development of wind and solar projects, as well as enabling easier financing.

You quickly went from being a group of lovers of alternative energy sources to their most successful developer in the region. As a woman in a male world, are you personally satisfied with what you’ve achieved?

I consider it obvious that women have a stronger awareness of why it’s important to preserve nature, both for us and for future generations. This is visible through politics and activism, and even in business.

Women in Serbia are very active in the field of environmental protection, and some hold important positions in institutions and private companies, but there are of course many challenges. Our company has achieved what it has in such a short time because we are all really “mission-driven”, and that’s reflected in the motivation, ambition, enthusiasm and work of employees. I think we’re advancing quickly because we believe that what we’re doing will be crucial for the future of the planet and Serbia, and we are not exclusively chasing profit.

The development of renewable energy sources is a lengthy process and it is necessary for people and companies to know why they are getting involved in it. I’m satisfied because I think this is a business model that is complemented by a slightly more feminine sensibility.

Women in Serbia are very active in the field of environmental protection, and some hold important positions in institutions and private companies

Serbia has the potential to develop more than 4 GW of green projects over the next ten years. Does the will, knowledge and determination exist to work on that, in order to realise this potential?

The will certainly exists, we increasingly encounter companies that have significant ambitions in the field of renewable energy sources. The obstacle is that it is a matter of very complex and demanding projects that also require great expertise, investments and a certain determination. You need to be persistent, to cooperate with a large number of stakeholders at the local and state level, and to employ lots of experts.

Serbia has, unfortunately, yet to show that it has the capacity for more than two or three serious players, but that will also change slowly. The Law on Renewable Energy Sources will certainly contribute to facilitating the development of wind and solar projects, as well as enabling easier financing. CWP certainly has serious plans, so we will contribute our share to those 4 GW, in order for us all to progress as quickly as possible.

What are the chances that Serbia, along with the rest of the world, will be a “carbon free” society by 2050? What is the alternative to that?

I think it’s difficult to talk about carbon neutrality at the global level at the moment, because it’s extremely clear that different countries are advancing at different speeds. Serbia still has much to do before we can even consider how to reach these goals for 2050.

What I find encouraging is that it seems to me that there is growing awareness among citizens on the topic of nature conservation and environmental protection, but for now I don’t see a sufficient engagement on the part of institutions. I think that the business world, in Serbia and everywhere around the world, will play a crucial role, because in the end we’re the ones who invest in projects and introduce certain changes. There is no existing alternative to a carbon free society.

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