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Marija Škrbić Dražić, Coordinator For Community Development & Social Responsibility, ManpowerGroup

Inclusion As A Form Of Responsibility

A number of different studies led to us becoming aware of the fact that developing and managing a culture and policies of diversity and inclusion within a company make that company socially responsible and desirable on the labour market. However, in order to be able to essentially call the company socially responsible in this area, we should explain this idea from the starting point, to ensure we have the right foundations

Diversity in the workplace can be both a good and a bad thing, largely depending on how the concept is nurtured and whether an inclusive culture is truly applied. The starting point would be a company’s decision to be inclusive, followed by the implementation of this business model and the familiarising of employees with the topic, including active work with them to enable management to start monitoring and managing inclusion within the company.

The answer to the question that arises (why is a culture of diversity and inclusion a desirable business model for the company?) lies in the employees, who represent the foundation of every company and its best brand ambassadors on the labour market.

New generations are increasingly recognising and defining “desirable” companies on the basis of their attitude towards the local environment, employees and inclusion, as well as the world in general: employees want a company’s values to align with their own values, which motivates them to work and contribute even more.

Motivated (and valued) employees are more involved, more innovative and more attached to the company and its overall goals.

Higher levels of involvement and innovation lead to business growth and, consequently, profit growth.

These factors influence the lifespan of the company, but also the local community and the world generally.

New generations are increasingly recognising and defining “desirable” companies on the basis of their attitude towards the local environment, employees and inclusion, as well as the world in general: employees want a company’s values to align with their own values, which motivates them to work and contribute even more

“A good company offers excellent products and services. A great company also offers excellent products and services, but also strives to make the world a better place.” ~ Philip Kotler, Corporate Social Responsibility: Doing the Most Good for Your Company and Your Cause.

Guided by the principles of corporate social responsibility, ManpowerGroup has launched the project “Business Inclusion”, with the objective and purpose of strengthening “hard-to-employ”, marginalised groups on our labour market while promoting a culture of diversity and inclusion.

We believe that if we have people who are more active in job searches and a market that is more open to accepting “hard-to-employ” groups, with an understanding of the advantages and benefits of this business model, we are on the right track to having more employed candidates from different groups and are, thus we, a step closer to business inclusion.

In conclusion – on the one hand, we can view inclusion and diversity as an orientation towards people and the humanising of business, while on the other hand, in essence, these values and culture, provided they are managed in the right way, can come to represent a strategic business model. And any resources directed towards their long-term development are most definitely an intelligent investment.

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